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at the NZAEE conference

Me as weather-controller in Flight of Pollen
Anneke picking up and dropping of Pollen
Predators have ravaged Ben’s Cloak (right)

Cloak building at Zealandia

in April, environmental educators gathered in Wellington for the annual NZAEE conference. On the Thursday evening, while some went off on a night-tour of Zealandia (and saw kiwi) we played games! Kakariki Games.

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birds can “see” earth’s magnetic fields

the evidence is strong. It seems that birds navigate by using a protein in their eyes that lets them “see” Earth’s magnetic fields.

The fancy eye protein is called Cry4. And it’s clustered in an area that receives a lot of light. Birds use the cryptochromes in their eyes to orient themselves by detecting magnetic fields

These findings come courtesy of two new papers – one studying robins, the other zebra finches.

Observations continue . .https://resonance.is/quantum-coherence-underlying-magnetoreception-avian-species-confirmed/

in FLIGHT OF POLLEN tui and korimako move around looking for
nectar, and later in the game kereru joins them in the hunt for berries

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we all have to eat

Mrs Thrush

Farmers and gardeners have been spraying their crops and flowers for years to protect them from pests.

We’re told that it has to be this way. Don’t believe it!

These pesticides harm and kill. Pollinating insects – gone. The small birds that feed on these insects – weakened, infertile. The larger birds that hunt the smaller birds (like karearea, our falcon) – birth eggs with shells so brittle, they break.

There are other ways to control our garden pests. For instance, Mrs Thrush. She eats slugs and snails. For free!

In Flight of Pollen, bees and hoverflies are important pollinators

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the Pollinator Crisis

seen any native bees lately?

is “off the charts, and downright scary.”

The Krefeld Entomological Society (est. 1905) has discovered huge declines in several observation sites throughout Western Europe.

In Australia, Jack Hasenpusch, an entomologist and owner of the Australian Insect Farm which collects swarms of wild insects, says: “. . . it’s left me dumbfounded, I can’t figure out what’s going on.”

Here in NZ, we’re still visited by moths at night, still finding bugs squashed on our car windscreens, still able to lie in an apple orchard and watch the hoverflies working, still able to visit a community garden in summer to watch oodles of native bees. . .

. . .and can even find a wild honeybee nest down where the free range chooks roam (which I did last week)

for now

for the full article, with source references:
https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/03/27/insect-decimation-upstages-global-warming/?mc_cid=15779e7147&mc_eid=115787945d

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LEARN to play EVENTS

let’s pollinate. Flight of Pollen
OR share (for those of you who already can-do)

FLIGHT OF POLLEN:

Otari-Wilton’s Bush Information Centre, WELLINGTON
SUNDAY 15 April 2pm

Mahara Gallery, Waikanae, KAPITI COAST
TUESDAY 17 April 1pm

Zealandia (for attendees of NZAEE Conference ONLY)
THURSDAY 19 April 8.30pm

Stonefields, AUCKLAND (contact me for more details)
SUNDAY 29 April 2pm

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Enviroschools / Te Aho Tu Roa / Kakariki Games EVENT

In the bush, Nga Manu Nature Reserve
at Nga Manu Nature Reserve, Waikanae

On Tuesday 13 March, students from five Kapiti Coast schools came together for a teacher and senior student workshop.

In the morning Flight of Pollen was played in the Education Centre. This was very appropriate since both the Centre and the game have received generous support from the Philipp Family Foundation.

Then the afternoon was spent touring the grounds. Nga Manu Reserve provided an ideal setting in which to explore the concepts of pollination of our native flora and fauna. And guide Rhys (pictured) carefully grounded the game play elements (plants, pollinators, weather elements).

“Brilliant” said parents and students. “We noticed things around us that the game had in it – like pollinators.” “We identified plants.” “We learnt new things.”

Having shown they can now play the game, it has gone back to their schools, with the responsibility to teach the game to the students there. . .

“We will introduce and pollinate our school with the game,” said Kapanui students Leo, Zane and Jasmin.

Did they develop understanding of this topical local and global issue? Yes, definitely.

“We will now be more aware of what pollinators do for us.“

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Meet the Providers

February was Meet-the-Providers month. Enviroschools in the Greater Wellington region invited teachers to meet with local providers of environmental resources.
Because Cloak of Protection has had huge support from Wellington Enviroschools, I attended events in the Kapiti Coast, in the Hutt Valley, and in the Wairarapa.
Many teachers were very complimentary about Cloak of Protection, and were keen to have a look at Flight of Pollen, and to learn our plans for teaching it.
Here is a table of Kakariki Game goodies, laid out in Featherston.